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JPR
"Chess on the Edge" and "Zurich 53"
Date: May 13, 2008 7:17:52 PM PDT
Author: JPR

I see a parallel between the two books.

If I remember well, Bronstein writes at the beginning (preface ?) that he wanted to write a book to TEACH chess. The games of the Zurich tournament was then kind of a database for games where he was to take his material to teach chess.

Now, "Chess on the Edge", and the way I see a parallel with "Zurich 53".

The trilogy "Chess on the Edge" is really a set of books to TEACH chess (strategy, tactics, planning, psychology, etc.), not "only" a book to analysed the games of an elite and most original player, Duncan Suttles. This is the parallel I see.

Of all the books I know, "Chess on the Edge" might very well be THE MOST INSTRUCTIVE AND ENTERTAINING of them all. Nothing less !

For me, the Suttles' trilogy has it's place among the top 10 or even 5 most important chess books of all time. Together with "Lasker's Manual of Chess", "My System", "Chess Paxis", all the books of Alekhine, and, yes, "Why Lasker Matters", and very few more.

Would somebody share his opinion on that matter ? But only if you agree with me ;-)

Jean-Pierre Rhéaume
 

 

BandW
"Chess on the Edge" and "Zurich 53"
Date: Jan 7, 2010 12:14:07 PM PST
Author: BandW

Originally Posted by JPR:
I see a parallel between the two books.

If I remember well, Bronstein writes at the beginning (preface ?) that he wanted to write a book to TEACH chess. The games of the Zurich tournament was then kind of a database for games where he was to take his material to teach chess.

Now, "Chess on the Edge", and the way I see a parallel with "Zurich 53".

The trilogy "Chess on the Edge" is really a set of books to TEACH chess (strategy, tactics, planning, psychology, etc.), not "only" a book to analysed the games of an elite and most original player, Duncan Suttles. This is the parallel I see.

Of all the books I know, "Chess on the Edge" might very well be THE MOST INSTRUCTIVE AND ENTERTAINING of them all. Nothing less !

For me, the Suttles' trilogy has it's place among the top 10 or even 5 most important chess books of all time. Together with "Lasker's Manual of Chess", "My System", "Chess Paxis", all the books of Alekhine, and, yes, "Why Lasker Matters", and very few more.

Would somebody share his opinion on that matter ? But only if you agree with me ;-)

Jean-Pierre Rhéaume


I agree having only read Duncan's first volume. It reads well and has lots of humour in it. I think I'm learning how to use this approach but of course lack Duncan's wonderful board vision and experience. I'm more aggressive now as black when the opponent is casually building his postion and often it works in my favour.

B and W
 

 
 
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